Air Force Contracting World Wide Training Summit Videos

If you haven’t already heard, we have the Air Force Contracting World Wide Training Summit scheduled for 1-4 April 2019! There are plans to Live Stream the General Assembly sessions so tune in!

Check out the websites to learn more!

CAC Access
https://www.afcontracting.hq.af.mil/AFCWWTS/

Public Sites
Agenda: https://ww3.safaq.hq.af.mil/Contracting/AFCWWTS/

Guest Speakers: https://ww3.safaq.hq.af.mil/Contracting/GUESTS

Facebook:

Instagram:

YouTube:

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Palmer Luckey Videos:

Part 1

Part 2

Part 3

Opening comments from Maj Gen Holt, “The Why”

National Defense Strategy:
https://dod.defense.gov/Portals/1/Documents/pubs/2018-National-Defense-Strategy-Summary.pdf

Day 3 comments from Maj Gen Holt, “The What”

Opening remarks from Dr Roper, SAF/AQ.

Many great quotes and stories. This is one of my favorites:

You can have a surface level knowledge of contracting and find 17 reasons why you can’t do something, very simple to do and a lot of people do it…or you can invest in becoming an expert and a contracting ninja to find the one way you can do it. That’s what all of us need to be.

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These videos were excellent and I’ve shared with our team at SMC! Now that the Discourse forum is live I’m just going to point them here to watch! Lots of great content! Keep it up!

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A post was split to a new topic: Innovation: Fad or Foundation?

A post was split to a new topic: Air Force to establish weapons school for acquisition officers

While Silicon Valley is an outlier in many regards, elites who don’t work in the national security ecosystem are increasingly divorced from it. One has to be over 50 to remember the days of military conscription, which ended in 1973, and of Social Security age to have been subject to it. For all but a handful of younger Americans, fighting wars is something other people do. They may well honor that service in the breach; but it’s hardly surprising that they want no part in the violence inherent in the enterprise.

Ironically, the best approach for sparking action in Silicon Valley may be to take a page from its counterculture roots and appeal to the humanitarian rather than the jingoistic front. Framing China as an enemy military will be less effective than a techno-moralist argument that the Chinese government will abuse these tools to surveil and oppress their people. The last thing the leaders or creatives want is to become tools of “the Man,” whether he sits in Washington or Beijing.

One of the central themes in Palmer’s talk was discussing the perception of the Pentagon in Silicon Valley.

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Article with issues discussed by both Maj Gen Holt and Palmer Luckey…

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Looks like everyone is doing their part.

An interesting Twitter thread on the topic of China, IP theft & trade.

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Ellen Lord, the Pentagon’s top acquisition official, unveiled the launch of the Trusted Capital Marketplace program, or TCM, on Friday, a public-private partnership that will convene trusted sources of private capital with innovative companies critical to the defense-industrial base and national security.

The program, which is the result of Section 1711 of the fiscal 2018 National Defense Authorization Act, represents a pilot program to support small and medium-sized companies that produce emerging defense and commercial technologies.

https://stratechery.com/2019/china-leverage-and-values/

Another perspective…

For obvious reasons, I think most people in tech are opposed to the Trump administration’s approach: not only is Trump unpopular in Silicon Valley generally (which means his policies are), but the near-term damage to U.S. tech companies could be significant.

At the same time, as someone who has argued that technology is an amoral force, China gives me significant pause. On one hand, while the shift of manufacturing to China has hurt the industrial heartlands of both the U.S. and Europe, nothing in history has had a greater impact on the alleviation of poverty and suffering of humanity generally than China’s embrace of capitalism and globalization, protectionist though it may have been. Technology, particularly improvements in global communication and transportation capabilities, played a major role in that.

On the other hand, for all of the praise that is heaped on Chinese service companies like Tencent for their innovation, the fact that everything on Tencent is monitored and censored is chilling, particularly when people disappear. The possibilities of a central government creating the conditions for, say, self-driving cars or some other top-down application of technology is appealing, but turning a city into a prison through surveillance is terrifying. And while it is tempting to fantasize about removing “fake news” and hateful content with an iron fist, it is a step down the road to removing everything that is objectionable to an unaccountable authority with little more than an adjustment to a configuration file.